Oil exploration causes environmental warming in Nigeria – NGO

 

 

Oil exploration causes environmental warming in Nigeria – NGO

 

Health of Mother Earth Foundation (HOMEF), a Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO), said oil exploration by multinational companies was a major contributor to environmental warming and climate change effects in Nigeria.

Coordinator of the organisation, Mr Nnimo Bassey, stated this on Sunday at an environmental awareness campaign tagged “Break Free 2016” in Ibeno, Akwa Ibom.

He said that exploitation of crude oil and flaring of gas had destroyed the ecosystem thereby causing environmental warming in the country.

“We can break free from fossil fuel; we cannot keep on burning fossil fuel and the oil companies knew many years ago that oil extraction causes global warming,” Bassey said.

He said that the spread of chemical in the ocean during oil spills had affected fishing activities in the parts of the country.

According to him, the polluted water has affected the quality and quantity of fish in the ocean.

“It is happening in 15 countries around the world; everybody is saying the use of crude oil, the use of crude, the use of gas is destroying the planet.

“It makes the planet to change, everywhere is hot; it is because when oil is burning, it pollutes the air as the weather is changing,” Bassey said.

He alleged that a scientific study sponsored by a multinational in the area had proved that oil exploration was detrimental to human health and the environment.

“They paid scientists to hide the information so that they can make profits in dollars now that the information is coming out in the USA,” Bassey alleged.

He called on the multinational companies to the leave the oil in the soil, saying that 80 per cent of the chemical kept in the soil had polluted the ocean.

Also speaking, Executive Director, Peace Point Action (PPA), another NGO, Mr Umo Isua-Ikoh, said that residents of oil-bearing communities were suffering from respiratory and skin diseases.

Ikoh attributed the situation to breathing of poisonous gases emitted into the air through oil exploration and extraction activities in the area.

He said that the objective of the awareness campaign was to stop the impunity committed in the Niger Delta by the oil multinational companies.

“If we are sincere about doing our part to fight climate change, then we must leave the oil and gas in the soil,” Ikoh said.

He said that oil and gas companies were sacrificing peoples’ lives and future of children “at the altar of profit’’ and that governments in the country had “unfortunately, become their bedfellows’’.

“Our roofs top wear and tear very fast because of acid rain. Companies around continue to flare gas with impunity in spite of several targets to end gas flaring.

“We want to see an end to gas flaring in the Niger Delta region,” Ikoh emphasised.

He claimed that though Akwa Ibom had been the highest oil producing state in Nigeria, it had the worst socio-economic indicators in the Niger Delta.

According to him, oil wealth does not directly translate to wealth and sustainable development for the people.

“The truth is that oil and gas exploration and production has left in its wake only environmental disaster, time bomb, poverty, disease and conflict in the region,” Ikoh said.

In his remarks, a former Chief Medical Superintendent in the state, Dr Charles Abakam, decried the state of devastation of the environment in Ibeno Local Government Area by oil extraction activities.

Abakam said that people living in an environment where oil was exploited had the tendency to develop prostate cancer.

He said that apart from destroying the ecosystem, oil exploration was injurious to the health of the people in the oil producing areas and called for cessation of oil extraction.

Source: Today.NG – https://www.today.ng/news/national/122557/oil-exploration-environmental-warming-nigeria-ngo

Ofserv Nigeria Limited achieves ISO Quality Management System Certification; a demonstration of unwavering commitment to process improvement

Lagos, Nigeria – November 30, 2015 – Ofserv Nigeria Limited is pleased to announce that it has received the ISO 9001:2008 certification for quality management system from the Standards Organization of Nigeria (SON).

ISO 9001: 2008 standard is accepted worldwide as a quality standard that provides the necessary framework for improving efficiency, minimizing risk and maximizing opportunities.

To be awarded the certification, our quality management system passed through a strict auditing procedure, where it demonstrated that its services successfully meets the applicable statutory and regulatory requirements.

What Does ISO Certification mean to us

  • Our achievement of the certificate is a proof that our services meet international standards and also a testament of our strict adherence to the ISO 9001:2008 standards
  • It’s an assurance of our conformity to customers’ requirement; the award would also aid in steering us toward enhancing our customer satisfaction.
  • It also signifies our willingness to continually improve our system via effective application of the system.

“ We are pleased to have achieved this certification, a demonstration of our commitment to a strong culture of quality “ said Dimeji Bassir, CEO of Ofserv. “ We are determined to continue to refine our quality system so that we can keep providing quality services to our clients in the oil and gas industry” he concluded.

About Ofserv

Ofserv is an integrated energy company organized to harvest opportunities across the E & P value chain.
Formed in 2008, Ofserv commenced operations in 2010 providing innovative and cost effective solutions within the upstream sector of the Energy industry.
Our strategy centers on employing creative solutions that accelerate field development as well as enhance our client’s operational efficiencies. With a deep understanding of the benefits of full commercialization of Oil & Gas fields, we are uniquely positioned to help maximize value and returns to asset owners.

Ofserv principals including its advisors draw on over 100 years of combined, world class Oil & Gas industry experience relevant to Africa. Our core competencies are in two broad based functional categories: Drilling & Facilities Maintenance, within which we provide an array of technical and consulting services.

For more information, visit www.ofserv.com

TIPS FOR HEALTHY LIVING

 

  • Copy your kitty:Learn to do stretching exercises when you wake up. It boosts circulation and digestion, and eases back pain.
  • Brush up on hygiene.Many people don’t know how to brush their teeth  Improper brushing can cause as much damage to the teeth and gums as not brushing at all. Lots of people don’t brush for long enough, don’t floss and don’t see a dentist regularly. Hold your toothbrush in the same way that would hold a pencil, and brush for at least two minutes.Get spiritual. A study conducted by the formidably sober and scientific Harvard University found that patients who were prayed for recovered quicker than those who weren’t, even if they weren’t aware of the prayer.
  • Get smelly.Garlic, onions, spring onions and leeks all contain stuff that’s good for you. A study at the Child’s Health Institute in Cape Town found that eating raw garlic helped fight serious childhood infections. Heat destroys these properties, so eat yours raw, wash it down with fruit juice or, if you’re a sissy, have it in tablet form.
  • Knock one back.A glass of red wine a day is good for you. A number of studies have found this, but a recent one found that the polyphenols (a type of antioxidant) in green tea, red wine and olives may also help protect you against breast cancer. It’s thought that the antioxidants help protect you from environmental carcinogens such as passive tobacco smoke.
  • Berries for your belly.Blueberries, strawberries and raspberries contain plant nutrients known as anthocyanidins, which are powerful antioxidants. Blueberries rival grapes in concentrations of resveratrol – the antioxidant compound found in red wine that has assumed near mythological proportions. Resveratrol is believed to help protect against heart disease and cancer.
  • Mindful living.You’ve probably heard the old adage that life’s too short to stuff a mushroom. But perhaps you should consider the opposite: that life’s simply too short NOT to focus on the simple tasks. By slowing down and concentrating on basic things, you’ll clear your mind of everything that worries you.
  • The secret of stretching.When you stretch, ease your body into position until you feel the stretch and hold it for about 25 seconds. Breathe deeply to help your body move oxygen-rich blood to those sore muscles. Don’t bounce or force yourself into an uncomfortable position.
  • Do your weights workout first.Experts say weight training should be done first, because it’s a higher intensity exercise compared to cardio. Your body is better able to handle weight training early in the workout because you’re fresh and you have the energy you need to work it.
  • Sugar-coated.More than three million South Africans suffer from type 2 diabetes, and the incidence is increasing – with new patients getting younger. New studies show this type of diabetes is often part of a metabolic syndrome (X Syndrome), which includes high blood pressure and other risk factors for heart disease.Good night, sweetheart. Rest heals the body and has been shown to lessen the risk of heart trouble and psychological problems.

HEALTHWATCH — THE EBOLA AWARENESS

Microscopic view of the Ebola virus Photo_ Frederick Murphy_CDC_PA
Microscopic view of the Ebola virus Photo: Frederick Murphy/CDC/PA

Ebola is a severe illness transmitted through direct contact with the blood, body fluids, and tissues of infected animals or people. Ebola is introduced into the human population through close contact with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected animals. In Africa, infection has been documented through the handling of infected chimpanzees, gorillas, fruit bats, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines found ill or dead or in the rainforest. It then spreads in the community through human-to-human transmission, with infection resulting from direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people, and indirect contact with environments contaminated with such fluids. Burial ceremonies in which mourners have direct contact with the body of the deceased person can also play a role in the transmission of Ebola.

 

SYMPTOMS

Symptoms typically start two days to three weeks after contracting the virus, with a fever, throat and muscle pains, and headaches. There is then typically nausea, vomiting, and diarrhoea, along with decreased functioning of the liver and kidneys. At this point, some people begin to have problems with bleeding.

 

Prevention

If you stay in an area with known Ebola cases, make sure you do the following:

  • Practice careful hygiene. Avoid contact with blood and body fluids.
  • Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids.
  • Avoid funeral or burial rituals that require handling the body of someone who has died from Ebola.
  • Avoid contact with bats and nonhuman primates or blood, fluids, and raw meat prepared from these animals.
  • Avoid hospitals where Ebola patients are being treated.
  • Monitor your health and seek medical care immediately if you develop symptoms of Ebola.

 

Treatment

There is no specific treatment for the virus; Efforts to help persons who are infected include giving them either oral rehydration therapy or intravenous fluids. The disease has a high mortality rate: often between 50% and 90% of those who are infected with the virus. It typically occurs in outbreaks in tropical regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. Between 1976, when it was first identified, and 2014, fewer than 1,000 people a year have been infected. The largest outbreak to date is the ongoing 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak, which is affecting Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. The disease was first identified in the Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Efforts are ongoing to develop a vaccine; however, none exists as of 2014.

 

Current and Past Outbreaks

Ebola first appeared in 1976 in Nzara, Sudan, and Yambuku, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Previously, the majority of Ebola cases occurred in the DRC, the Republic of the Congo, Sudan, and Uganda. The current Ebola outbreak is one of the largest Ebola outbreaks in history and the first in West Africa. It is affecting four countries in West Africa: Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. Cases have also been recorded in the past in places like England in 1976 with one (1) reported case and no deaths, in the United States of America in 1994 with four (4) reported cases and no deaths and in 2004, one (1) death was reported in Russia as a result of the Ebola virus.

 

Ebola in Nigeria

The Government of Nigeria (GoN) declared a State of Emergency on August 8 and approved more than $11 million to combat EVD, according to international media. Nigeria’s first reported EVD case occurred when a dual Liberian–American citizen traveled from Liberia to Lagos on July 20 and died on July 25 after expressing symptoms. Nigeria had tested and confirmed 10 additional EVD cases—all individuals who had direct contact with the initial case—as of August 12, international media report.

 

Click here to get more information on the Ebola virus.